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The Merchant of Venice

By: William Shakespeare

Your silence and attention, worthy friends, / That your free spirits may with more pleasing sense / Relish the life of this our active scene: / To which intent, to calm this murmuring breath, / We ring this round with our invoking spells; / If that your listning ears be yet prepard / To entertain the subject of our play, / Lend us your patience. / Tis Peter Fabell, a renowned Scholler, / Whose fame hath still been hitherto forgot / By all the writers of this latter age. ...

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The Three Musketeers

By: Pere Alexander Dumas

AUTHOR'S PREFACE: In which it is proved that, notwithstanding their names' ending in OS and IS, the heroes of the story which we are about to have the honor to relate to our readers have nothing mythological about them. A short time ago, while making researches in the Royal Library for my History of Louis XIV, I stumbled by chance upon the Memoirs of M. d'Artagnan, printed—as were most of the works of that period, in which authors could not tell the truth without the ris...

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Evolve Game Developers Conference

By: Alan Yu

Reference

Excerpt: Electronic Arts: Mark Cerny; Cerny Games; Doug Church; Eidos Interactive; Mark DeLoura; Sony Computer; Entertainment America; Alex Dunne; Julian Eggebrecht; Factor 5; Chris Hecker; Definition Six; Elaine Hodgson; Incredible Technologies; Rob Huebner; Nihilistic Software; Cyrus Lum; Inevitable Entertainment; Masaya Matsuura; NanaOn - Sha; Julien Merceron; Ubi Soft Entertainment; Tetsuya Mizuguchi; David Perry; Shiny Entertainment; Jason Rubin; Naughty Dog; Jez Sa...

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The Innocents Abroad

By: Mark Twain

When I last made a memorandum, we were at Ephesus. We are in Syria, now, encamped in the mountains of Lebanon. The interregnum has been long, both as to time and distance. We brought not a relic from Ephesus! After gathering up fragments of sculptured marbles and breaking ornaments from the interior work of the Mosques; and after bringing them at a cost of infinite trouble and fatigue, five miles on muleback to the railway depot, a government officer compelled all who ha...

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Aesop's Fables

By: George Fyler Townsend

PREFACE: THE TALE, the Parable, and the Fable are all common and popular modes of conveying instruction. Each is distinguished by its own special characteristics. The Tale consists simply in the narration of a story either founded on facts, or created solely by the imagination, and not necessarily associated with the teaching of any moral lesson. The Parable is the designed use of language purposely intended to convey a hidden and secret meaning other than that contained...

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The Tower

By: William Butler Yeats

THAT is no country for old men. The young / In one another's arms, birds in the trees / - Those dying generations - at their song, / The salmon-falls, the mackerel-crowded seas, / Fish, flesh, or fowl, commend all summer long / Whatever is begotten, born, and dies. / Caught in that sensual music all neglect / Monuments of unageing intellect. / An aged man is but a paltry thing, / A tattered coat upon a stick, unless / Soul clap its hands and sing, and louder sing / For e...

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The Magic Shop

By: Herbert George Wells

I had seen the Magic Shop from afar several times; I had passed it once or twice, a shop window of alluring little objects, magic balls, magic hens, wonderful cones, ventriloquist dolls, the material of the basket trick, packs of cards that LOOKED all right, and all that sort of thing, but never had I thought of going in until one day, almost without warning, Gip hauled me by my finger right up to the window, and so conducted himself that there was nothing for it but to ...

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The Cruise of the Snark

By: Jack London

It began in the swimming pool at Glen Ellen. Between swims it was our wont to come out and lie in the sand and let our skins breathe the warm air and soak in the sunshine. Roscoe was a yachtsman. I had followed the sea a bit. It was inevitable that we should talk about boats. We talked about small boats, and the seaworthiness of small boats. We instanced Captain Slocum and his three years' voyage around the world in the Spray. We asserted that we were not afraid to go ar...

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Anne of Avonlea

By: Lucy Maud Montgomery

my former teacher HATTIE GORDON SMITH in grateful remembrance of her sympathy and encouragement Flowers spring to blossom where she walks The careful ways of duty, Our hard, stiff lines of life with her Are flowing curves of beauty. -WHITTIER An Irate Neighbor I Selling in Haste and Repenting at Leisure II Mr. Harrison at Home V Different Opinions47 V A Full-fledged Schoolma’am VI All Sorts and Conditions of Men. . .and women...

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A Kidnapped Santa Claus

By: L. Frank Baum

Santa Claus lives in the Laughing Valley, where stands the big, rambling castle in which his toys are manufactured. His workmen, selected from the ryls, knooks, pixies and fairies, live with him, and every one is as busy as can be from one year's end to another. It is called the Laughing Valley because everything there is happy and gay. The brook chuckles to itself as it leaps rollicking between its green banks; the wind whistles merrily in the trees; the sunbeams dance ...

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The Circus Boys on the Flying Rings, Or Making the Start in the Sa...

By: Edgar B. P. Darlington

CHAPTER I. THE LURE OF THE CIRCUS I say, Phil, I can do that. Do what, Teddy? A cartwheel in the air like that fellow is doing in the picture on the billboard there. Oh, pshaw! You only think you can. Besides, that's not a cartwheel; that's a double somersault. It's a real stunt, let me tell you. Why, I can do a cartwheel myself. But up in the air like that—well, I don't know. I guess not. I'd be willing to try it, though, if I had something below to catch me, added the ...

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Poems from the Rossetti Manuscript Part Ii

By: William Blake

A Fairy leapt upon my knee Singing and dancing merrily; I said, `Thou thing of patches, rings, Pins, necklaces, and such-like things, Disgracer of the female form, Thou paltry, gilded, poisonous worm!'...

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Purgatory

By: Dante Aligheri

CANTO I: Invocation to the Muses. Dawn of Easter on the shore of Purgatory. The Four Stars. Cato. The cleansing of Dante from the stains of Hell. To run over better waters the little vessel of my genius now hoists its sails, and leaves behind itself a sea so cruel; and I will sing of that second realm where the human spirit is purified and becomes worthy to ascend to heaven. But here let dead poesy rise again, O holy Muses, since yours I am, and here let Calliope somewha...

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The Red Badge of Courage

By: Stephen Crane

THE cold passed reluctantly from the earth, and the retiring fogs revealed an army stretched out on the hills, resting. As the landscape changed from brown to green, the army awakened, and began to tremble with eagerness at the noise of rumors. It cast its eyes upon the roads, which were growing from long troughs of liquid mud to proper thoroughfares. A river, ambertinted in the shadow of its banks, purled at the army's feet; and at night, when the stream had become of a...

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Birds and Poets

By: John Burroughs

PREFACE: I have deliberated a long time about coupling some of my sketches of outdoor nature with a few chapters of a more purely literary character, and thus confiding to my reader what absorbs and delights me inside my four walls, as well as what pleases and engages me outside those walls; especially since I have aimed to bring my outdoor spirit and method within, and still to look upon my subject with the best naturalist's eye I could command.

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Medea, Hecuba, Hippolytus, The Trojan Women, The Bacchantes

By: Euripides

AH! WOULD to Heaven the good ship Argo ne'er had sped its course to the Colchian land through the misty blue Symplegades, nor ever in the glens of Pelion the pine been felled to furnish with oars the chieftain's hands, who went to fetch the golden fleece for Pelias; for then would my own mistress Medea never have sailed to the turrets of Iolcos, her soul with love for Jason smitten, nor would she have beguiled the daughters of Pelias to slay their father and come to live...

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The Second Jungle Book

By: Rudyard Kipling

The Law of the Jungle -- which is by far the oldest law in the world -- has arranged for almost every kind of accident that may befall the Jungle People, till now its code is as perfect as time and custom can make it. You will remember that Mowgli spent a great part of his life in the Seeonee Wolf-Pack, learning the Law from Baloo, the Brown Bear; and it was Baloo who told him, when the boy grew impatient at the constant orders, that the Law was like the Giant Creeper, b...

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The Food of the Gods

By: Herbert George Wells

Certainly both Mr. Bensington and Professor Redwood was quite merited any of these terms long before they came upon the marvellous discovery of which this story tells. Mr. Bensington was a Fellow of the Royal Society and a former president of the Chemical Society, and Professor Redwood was Professor of Physiology in the Bond Street College of the London University and had been grossly libelled by the anti-vivisectionists time after time. And both had led lives of academi...

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The Black Death and the Dancing Mania

By: Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker

INTRODUCTION: Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker was one of three generations of distinguished professors of medicine. His father, August Friedrich Hecker, a most industrious writer, first practised as a physician in Frankenhausen, and in 1790 was appointed Professor of Medicine at the University of Erfurt. In 1805 he was called to the like professorship at the University of Berlin. He died at Berlin in 1811. Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker was born at Erfurt in January, 1795. He...

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A Kidnapped Santa Claus

By: L. Frank Baum

Santa Claus lives in the Laughing Valley, where stands the big, rambling castle in which his toys are manufactured. His workmen, selected from the ryls, knooks, pixies and fairies, live with him, and every one is as busy as can be from one year’s end to another.

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